All Because of a Black Stamp — Jordan Brand’s “Friends & Family” Design Differences

PlayPauseListen to the Audio Version of the Story
0
0

What do Rolex's subtle reference number differences, Playboy's underlying star system, and a black stamp on a pair of Air Jordans have in common? It's about how logistics can unassumingly play a role in future brand equity.

Text by Alex Maeland
Audio by Elphick Wo

What do Rolex's subtle reference number differences, Playboy's underlying star system, and a black stamp on a pair of Air Jordans have in common? It's about how logistics can unassumingly play a role in future brand equity.

Text by Alex Maeland
Audio by Elphick Wo

So, a guy I know

…works for Jordan Brand.

Without putting too much of his business out there, he’s close to the heart of the brand’s latest “Energy” product category. Nike and Jordan Brand have always been good about guising their product offerings by internal (and often external) marketing monikers. The Energy extension of the brand effectively houses a special range of product that the brand leverages to build energy and momentum around certain products and SKU’s. It most often looks like strategic partnership designs – AKA: collabs.

In a way that few brands have been able to fully harness, Nike and Jordan Brand’s trickle down product strategy uses the Energy category to set the consumer demand trend for a certain model or color palette. They debut the Energy product at a carefully curated range of independent retailers as well as via their NikeLab doors in places like New York, London, Hong Kong, Shanghai, and other flagship cities. But, the Energy category is not the bread and butter for the brand. It’s their marketing finesse that allows them to capitalize on demand by iterating upon those Energy product offerings in the seasons to follow via wider distribution doors and retailers.

Create demand, set the trend, flood the market, milk the cow. It’s a turnkey strategy that not only allows them to appear innovative and trendsetting but it also enables them to reap the market rewards once the trends hit the mainstream.

No stranger to the Swoosh, Hiroshi Fujiwara was tapped by Jordan Brand to curate a special fragment design x Jordan 1 collaboration. A hyped shoe in its own regard, Fujiwara’s subtle fragment blue chromatic infusion to the leather heel panel of the Jordan 1 was all that was needed to get the sneakerhead squad fiending. When they dropped, the demand was crazy, the lines long and the re-sell price immediately went through the roof. The shoes are still running around $1,000-$1,500 USD.

<p>At the time of posting, the fragment design x Air Jordan I consistently sells anywhere between $1,000 &#8211; $1,500 USD.</p>

At the time of posting, the fragment design x Air Jordan I consistently sells anywhere between $1,000 – $1,500 USD.

Context—
PlayPause
1X
Play now
Title
Playlist
Read Article